How Paul Surprisingly Denied the Trinity Doctrine

Most Christians today hold the Trinity doctrine to be true. However, do you know that Paul didn’t even mention the Trinity doctrine? In fact, he has denied it through his writings. Want to know how? Read on!

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The Apostle Paul is known to be the apostle to the gentiles. He is even known to be the recorder of many theological doctrines for the early church. Yet, throughout his writings, you will never find any mention of the Trinity.

Could the Apostle Paul has been blinded to this new truth? Or is the Trinity simply a teaching not rooted in the Bible?

You need to learn the truth.

How Paul Surprisingly Denied the Trinity Doctrine

Do you know that Paul’s writing never gave a hint of the existence of a Trinity God?

What is Trinity?

The Trinity is among the most popular and widely accepted doctrines of mainstream Christianity. For many, you will never be considered as a Christian without accepting the Trinity doctrine. It has served to be a LITMUS PAPER of Christianity.

As popular as this doctrine is, the word “Trinity” is never mentioned in the Bible. The belief that God is made up of three persons coexisting in one substance or being is nowhere found in the Holy Scripture – from Genesis to Revelation.

If Trinity is not found in the Bible, where did it originate? This can be a long topic and I highly recommend you read this article to know its history.

However, just to summarize, the doctrine of Trinity was formed during the Council of Nicaea in the year 325. It was presided by Constantine – a pagan emperor who had little knowledge about Christianity.

3 Ways How Paul Denied the Trinity

If there is one person in the Bible who will teach about Trinity, it should have been Paul. However, this never happened as evidenced by his writings. Here are some of the evidence of Paul not acknowledging the existence of the Triune God.

1. SALUTATIONS IN HIS EPISTLES – throughout the letters of Paul, you will not find a single mention of the Holy Spirit as a separate being. In fact, he only mentioned two, God the Father and Yahshua (Jesus Christ). Here are some examples:

  • To all that be in Rome, beloved of God, called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ (Romans 1:7).
  • Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ (I Corinthians 1:3).
  • Grace be to you and peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ (II Corinthians 1:2).
  • Grace be to you and peace from God the Father, and from our Lord Jesus Christ (Galatians 1:3).
  • Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ (Ephesians 1:2).
  • Please read Philippians 1:2; Colossians 1:2; I Thessalonians 1:1; II Thessalonians 1:2; I Timothy 1:2; II Timothy 1:2; Titus 1:4; and Philemon 1:3.

You can see in these salutations that the Holy Spirit is left out. If Paul recognized that the Holy Spirit is another divine being, then he should have included it in his salutations. Failure in doing so can mean a BIG insult to the Holy Spirit.

2. THE AUDIENCE OF PAUL – the majority of the recipients of Paul’s letters are gentiles. These gentiles have polytheistic background who had formerly worshipped different gods. Sending them letters is a golden opportunity for Paul to teach the Trinity and introduce new converts to this doctrine. However, we don’t find any of those things.

3. I CORINTHIANS 8:6 – This verse tells us, “But to us, there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him.” Come to think about it, if Paul really believes in the Trinity, why would he not mention it here? Instead, we consistently see only two beings, God the Father and Jesus Christ.

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The only mention of the Holy Spirit along with God the Father and Jesus Christ is II Corinthians 13:14. It says, “The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, be with you all. Amen.”

This does not support the Trinity doctrine. This only means that Christians are bonded and unified by God’s Spirit. We have FELLOWSHIP with God and Jesus through the Holy Spirit, which is their power (Luke 1:35).

Final Words

There is no doubt that Paul and other writers of the Bible did not recognize the Trinity Doctrine. In fact, they have consistently taught about God the Father and Jesus Christ.

This is one of the greatest truths in the Bible and also the most IGNORED! If we are to worship God, it must be done in truth and spirit (John 4:24). Therefore, we must always examine the things we believe in and have God’s word as our ultimate authority.

How about you? Do you think Paul supported the Trinity Doctrine? Share your thoughts by leaving a comment.


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29 thoughts on “How Paul Surprisingly Denied the Trinity Doctrine

  1. Hi Joshua, I won’t be able to develop the entire thought here, and I wouldn’t use the blogosphere to try to argue such a topic other than to say: you reference Philippians and Colossians to further prove your “salutations” argument. But reading further into those letters alone will force you to read passages like: Phil 2:6-11, and Col 1:15-20. I will leave it at that. The “doctrine of the Trinity” did not get articulated till Origen in @ 3rd century, but the mystery of God’s communal being has always been the great reality of God’s own existence. Shalom

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    • Hi Rusty, Thanks for stopping by and comment. I checked Phil 2:6-11 and Col 1:15-20, but I can’t see how it supports the trinity doctrine. Origen is not inspired by God. Why would God use Origen if He can use any of the apostles to explicitly teach the trinity. Origen is also known to contradict many teachings of Paul and John. That’s why he is never canonized as a saint by the RCC. So why would we believe Origen?

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      • Sorry Josh, but I wasn’t trying to enlist the aid of Origen, only to say he was the first to articulate it. Here was my (unsatisfactory) attempt to speak more eloquently to the idea of the Communion of the Triune God. I am quite sure this will not convince you, but then again, I am not very interested in carrying out a blog debate on something so profound: https://moreenigma.wordpress.com/2015/11/01/what-language-shall-i-borrow/

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      • Hi Rusty,
        I read your blog. You mentioned that the trinity is difficult to understand and incomprehensible. This should not be the case. The God family should not be a mystery for all of us. The trinity is difficult to understand because there’s no scripture to support and explain it. The Bible say, “this is ETERNAL LIFE, that they KNOW you the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent” (John 17:3). Again no mention of the HS as a persona. God wants us to KNOW him – to understand and comprehend. Let us not base our belief on traditions, but let’s base it on the word of God. The trinity doctrine is unbiblical. We can’t simply explain it because it lacks biblical proof. So whom will you believe? The word of God or the word of men? why not stick to the word of God?

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  2. Pingback: How Paul Surprisingly Denied the Trinity Doctrine | seekinghisplanforme

  3. Not one single passage you cite denies the Trinity. Many verses, such as John 14:15 directly affirm the Trinity. Your argument from silence wouldn’t survive undergraduate theology class. What you have done here is eisegesis.

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  4. Pingback: The 7 Shocking Truths about the Trinity Your Pastor Does not Tell You – Becoming Christians

  5. Our Creator and Heavenly Father is not the author of confusion and what could possibly be more confusing than the Trinity ?
    There is no topic under the sun, much less in the Bible – from Genesis to Revelation, that is more confusing than the Trinity.
    I’m thankful that Yeshua had a rare moment when he actually agreed with a Torah Scholar (Mark 12:28-34) regarding the Greatest Commandment, and Yeshua informed him that he “was not far from the Kingdom of God,” but only after they had quoted the Shema to each other.
    I agree with Yeshua and the scholar, and I sincerely hope I’m not far from the Kingdom of God.
    JB

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  6. the Trinity Doctrine was not from the beginning. It’s a doctrine of men. Early Church Father tertullian. If the Holy Spirit was a separate being, Jesus would call the Holy Spirit his father, what was a holy spirit that come up on Mary when she conceived him. This is the very same holy spirit that be gets us when we receive Christ. The confusion regarding the trinity has its roots in man’s attempt two Define one God in a numerical value. One God is not referring to a quantity a number it is referring to a quality. One God, one truth, one mind, one body, one spirit. Whole, complete indivisible and self-sustaining. Here are two scriptures where Jesus himself is describing the Oneness of God and you will notice the holy spirit is not mentioned for it would be redundant. We know this description is complete because Jesus uses the word one and the word us. St John 17 verses 11 and 21 Holy Father keep to your own man those who you have given me that they( may be one as we are) verse 21 that they (all may be one) as you father are in me and I in you that they also( may be one in US.) Now this is not nearly as confusing as one plus one plus one equals one

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  7. We read that Jesus emptied Himself and took the for? Of a man, born of a woman. Lived and died as a man. Was raised as a man ad we are told He is still he man Jesus Christ. There is no mention f him returning to his former state.

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    • There are a lot of verses which show us that Yahshua or Jesus, as He is popularly, known is already in heaven.
      These are some of the verses:

      ACTS 7:55–56; ROMANS 8:34; EPHESIANS 1:20; COLOSSIANS 3:1; HEBREWS 1:3; HEBREWS 8:1.

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  8. Actually the Trinity doctrine was coming in long before Constantine, it was the son of a Roman Centurian (Tertullian) that was a main player in bringing that in. My book has a section on the Trinity, and here is a clip from that Chapter: Some may ask where this word “Trinity” originated, since it is not in the Old Testament, the Septuagint, or the New Covenant scriptures.
    It’s historically clear that three different gods made up the Roman triad, with Jupiter as the supreme god of the Roman pantheon alongside Juno and Minerva. On Rome’s Capitoline Hill stood an elaborate temple where their deities (called the “Capitoline Triad”) were worshipped. Earlier in Roman history, a previous version of this Triad—commonly called the “Archaic Triad”—was made up of Jupiter, Mars, and Quirinus.
    The Greek he trias, which means “the triad,” was first used in a Christian sense by Theophilus, the bishop of Antioch (ca. 169–ca. 183) to refer to God, God’s logos, and God’s Sophia. It is hard to discern Theophilus’s exact meaning; some say he was referring to the Holy Spirit with Sophia and to Christ with the logos. According to McClintock and Strong, Theophilus “was educated a heathen, and afterwards converted to Christianity …. Having been converted from heathenism by the study of the Scriptures, he wrote an apology for the Christian faith, addressed in the form of a letter to his friend Autolycus.” 
    It was in this letter to Autolycus (Apology to Autolycus 2:15) that we have the first Christian usage of the Greek term for “the triad” in connection with God. But it was third-century church writer Tertullian who is credited with coining the term trinitas—a Latinization of the Greek he trias—which later became “Trinity” in English. Born to a Roman centurion in Carthage, Tertullian later converted to Christianity in Rome and is often called the father of Latin Christianity.
    As for the Jewish believers, they never used the Greek term he trias in the scriptures, nor did they portray God as a triad, for they knew God was one.
    After Rome destroyed the Jewish Temple (AD 70) and then slaughtered Bar Kochba who led the Jewish revolt against Rome (AD 135), the Roman emperor Hadrian forbade the Jews to enter Jerusalem altogether. He not only renamed Jerusalem “Aelia Capitolina” in honor of the Jupiter temple on Rome’s Capitoline Hill, but he also subsequently erected another temple to Jupiter on the very site where the Jewish Temple had once stood, blatantly showing that the Roman God (and Triad of Gods) was now in control.
    While some readers may not like the history given here, it’s important nonetheless to examine the origins of our English word “Trinity” and how this was yet another concept that changed over time.
    (see here for that whole Chapter: http://themessianicfeast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/TMF_SettingTable_2.pdf

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  9. i believe in yahweh the Father and Yahshua the Son and the Holy Spirit as Gods power which He uses in many different ways to teach us and draw us to Him.I am not a learned man or a scholar at all i am just a simple man struggling to be led by the example Yahshua left with us.recently a coworker of mine said i am blaspheming the Holy Spirit and that i am going to hell because i dont believe in the trinity. he left me with a number of scriptures to prove his doctrine,only 2 stuck out that made me question my disbelief in the trinity. 1 Corinthians 12:11 and John 14:26 where the Holy Spirit is referred to as He.i would appreciate any insight anyone has on these 2 scriptures or any other scriptures that refer to the Holy Spirit as He or Him.thank you very much.

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    • Hi Rick!

      I understand how these verses could cause confusion. Let me share with you the explanation found on this page: https://www.ucg.org/bible-study-tools/booklets/is-god-a-trinity/why-the-holy-spirit-is-sometimes-incorrectly-referred-to-as-he-and-him

      Greek, like the Romance languages deriving from Latin (Spanish, French, Italian, etc.), assigns a specific gender for every noun. Every object, animate or inanimate, is designated as either masculine, feminine or neuter. The gender is often unrelated to whether the item is indeed masculine or feminine.

      For example, in French the word livre, meaning “book,” is of the masculine gender and is referred to by a pronoun equivalent to the English “he” or “him.” And in Spanish, mesa, or “table,” is in the feminine. Clearly, although these nouns have gender, their gender does not refer to actually being male or female. In the English language, in contrast, most nouns that do not refer to objects that are male or female are referred to in the neuter sense, with the pronoun “it.”

      We might note that in the Hebrew language, in which the Old Testament was written, the word translated “spirit,” ruach, is referred to with feminine pronouns. But the Holy Spirit clearly is not female or a woman.

      In Greek, both masculine and neuter words are used to refer to the Holy Spirit. The Greek word translated “Counselor,” “Helper,” “Comforter” and “Advocate” in John chapters 14 to 16 is parakletos , a masculine word in Greek and thus referred to in these chapters by Greek pronouns equivalent to the English “he,” “him,” “his,” “himself,” “who” and “whom.”

      Because of the masculine gender of parakletos, these pronouns are grammatically correct in Greek. But to translate these into English as “he,” “him,” etc., is grammatically incorrect.

      For example, you would never translate a particular French sentence into English as “I’m looking for my book so I can read him.” While this grammatical construction makes sense in the French language, it is wrong in English. In the same way, to suppose on this basis that the Holy Spirit is a person to be referred to as “he” or “him” is incorrect.

      Only if the parakletos or helper were known to be a person could the use of a gender-inflected pronoun justifiably be used in English. And the term parakletos certainly can refer to a person—as it refers to Jesus Christ in 1 John 2:1. Yet the Holy Spirit is nowhere designated with personhood. So personal pronouns should not be substituted for it.

      Furthermore, there is absolutely no theological or biblical justification for referring to the term “Holy Spirit” with masculine pronouns, even in Greek. The Greek word pneuma, translated “spirit” (but also translated “wind” and “breath” in the New Testament) is a grammatically neuter word. So, in the Greek language, pronouns equivalent to the English “it,” “its,” “itself,” “which” or “that” are properly used in referring to this word translated into English as “spirit.”

      Yet when the King James or Authorized Version was produced (early in the 1600s), the doctrine of the Trinity had already been accepted for more than 1,000 years. So naturally the translators of that version, influenced by that belief, usually chose personal rather than neutral pronouns when referring to the Holy Spirit in English (see, for example, John 16:13-14; Romans 8:26).

      However, this wasn’t always the case. Notice that in some passages in the King James Version the translators did use the proper neuter pronouns. For example, Romans 8:16 says, “The Spirit itself [not himself ] beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God.” Similarly, Romans 8:26 says “the Spirit itself [again, not himself ] maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.” In these cases the translators correctly used neuter pronouns because the Greek word pneuma, translated “Spirit,” is neuter in gender.

      Another example is Matthew 10:20, where Jesus says: “For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit of your Father which [not who ] speaketh in you.” Another is 1 Peter 1:11, which refers to “the Spirit of Christ which [again, not who ] was in them.” The King James Version translators did use the proper neuter pronouns in these verses.

      Regrettably, later English translators of the Bible have gone further than the King James translators in referring to the Holy Spirit with masculine rather than neuter pronouns. Thus the Holy Spirit is almost always referred to as “he” or “him” in the more modern versions. This reflects not linguistic accuracy, but the doctrinal bias or incorrect assumptions of Bible translators who wrongly believe the Holy Spirit is a person.

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  10. hey there. I’m not in a church. here the last few months I’m finding the Trinitarian doctrine harder and harder to believe. most churches believe it but there are more passages that don’t support it than that do. recently I mentioned this to my brother over the phone and he cut loose about the trinity and how I’m worshipping a different god if I don’t see support 4 the trinity.

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  11. O.K. I’m pretty sure the trinity is made up, however it appears the holy spirit is an entity, the spirit of truth, and not just ” the power of God”. so where is there a church that doesn’t acknowledge a trinity but still believes the holy spirit is an individual that teaches us, john 14:26 ? I’m all alone here

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    • Hi Richard! John 14:26 uses the wrong pronoun. Instead of “it”, it uses “he” to refer to the Holy Spirit. Because of the trinity influence, the translators deliberately used “he” instead of “it”.

      I do hope you find a church or group that shares your belief. However, feel free to reach out to us if you need people to fellowship with. 🙂

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  12. Hello Joshua!
    Matthew 12:30-32 ….Anyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but anyone who speaks against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come.” Similar quotes in Mark 3:28-30 and Luke 12:8-10. Appears that Jesus is referring to a Divine Entity. Is this Divine Entity a separate Being or a reference to God Himself? Any Thoughts ?

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