The BIGGEST problem with setting SMART Goals

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If you want to succeed, then you should have goals.

But how do you set goals?

We have been taught that goals should be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely. In short, they should be smart.

However, do you know that SMART goals are not that really smart?

While it is true that SMART goals are helpful, they can stagnate our personal and spiritual growth.

Let me explain.

SMART Goals focuses on doing what’s easy.

Instead of attaining goals that challenge us, it only helps us achieve specific and attainable goals.

If you really want to enjoy growth, you need to challenge yourself.

Instead of having SMART Goals, you need to STRETCH Goals.

Stretch Goals allow you to focus on things that make you grow.

If you think about it, the most successful people didn’t settle with SMART Goals.

They make sure that they set goals that will challenge and bring them out of their comfort zone.

The great inventors and innovators in human history didn’t have SMART Goals. They were willing to take risks and go beyond what was thought to be impossible.

That’s the reason we have the lightbulb, cars, telephone, smartphone, TV, and other scientific breakthroughs.

As Christians today, we need to be not just aiming for what is demanded of us.

We must be profitable servants – someone who goes the extra mile.

In a sense, if you are simply aiming to do what is expected from you, you will never grow.

Yahshua or Jesus Christ said in Luke 17:10:

“So likewise you, when you have done all those things which you are commanded, say, ‘We are unprofitable servants. We have done what was our duty to do.’ ”

You see, SMART Goals will only encourage you to focus on what’s easy. Stretch Goals, on the other hand, helps you focus on what’s right and needed.

After all:

“Christians are not called to do what’s easy, but rather what’s right.”

So, don’t settle on mediocrity. We are expected to give our best in everything that we do (Ecclesiastes 9:10).

When we more than what we are expected, then we can be more confident in saying, “We are profitable servants.”


If you want to know more about SMART Goals and Stretch Goals, please read my latest Books for Greatness blog, “Why SMART Goals Are Stupid (And What You Should Do Instead).”

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